Cities benefit from restoring two-way traffic

Two-way streets prove safer, more walkable, and more supportive of business than one-way streets for Midwestern cities.   ROBERT STEUTEVILLE  JUL. 9, 2019

Two-way streets prove safer, more walkable, and more supportive of business than one-way streets for Midwestern cities.

ROBERT STEUTEVILLE JUL. 9, 2019

Midwestern cities report significant success restoring two-way traffic on one-way streets. New Albany, Indiana, switched more than four miles of city streets while implementing traffic-calming measures made possible by the conversions. Police Chief Wm. Todd Bailey reports that the two-way street designs are “overwhelmingly” superior in the following respects:

  • Accidents involving pedestrians are down.

  • Speeding is reduced. The previous one-way configurations allowed motorists to travel “well above posted speed limits,” Bailey says, whereas the new designs “have slowed traffic as planned.”

  • Motor vehicle crashes are down, especially injury crashes, compared to previous years.

  • In general, the streets work better. “It has been our observation that the new designs allow for motor vehicles, bicycles, and pedestrians to all interact in a much smoother manner,” he says. “Additionally, due to the new design, when we experience a problem, we are provided with more options to redirect traffic. The design has also facilitated a better response from police and fire as those options have multiplied.”