What’s the real cost of new freeways in Houston?

When drivers on Waugh approach the intersection with Allen Parkway, they can turn east toward downtown without having to stop or slow down. It’s called a “slip lane.”

Pedestrians crossing there into Buffalo Bayou Park, though, do have to stop and slow down. When I walk to the park to exercise, I crane over my shoulder and try to guess whether drivers will stay speeding north or turn east through the slip lane, and I wait for my chance at the crosswalk. There’s a yield sign, of course, and there’s also a Texas law that requires drivers to yield to pedestrians in crosswalks. But there’s not much yielding going on. So I have to rush to the hunk of concrete in the intersection called a “refuge island,” hide behind the signal pole, say a prayer to the patron saint of vulnerable road users and then hurry across a few more lanes into the park. Who needs cardio after an exercise like that?

Reimagining Kenmore Square

Close your eyes and imagine a new Kenmore Square.

A soaring 28-story glass hotel rises up from a tree-lined plaza at the fork in the road where Beacon Street and Commonwealth Avenue split. The patch where the hotel stands is also an oasis for people who are window shopping or looking for a spot to sip their iced coffee on a breezy spring day. Cars, pedestrians, and cyclists coexist calmly and safely in a new and simplified intersection, and crossing through it no longer feels like an exercise in self-preservation. Kenmore Square is now a scenic gateway, in one direction toward Boston University, in another toward Fenway Park, and in a third toward the beautiful canopy heading downtown along Commonwealth Avenue.

Now open your eyes. That’s the vision for Kenmore Square unveiled Tuesday night by Mark Development CEO Robert Korff, who says he wants to turn one of Boston’s busiest and best-known intersections into a destination that would “put the square back in Kenmore Square.”

Urban Planning for Utopia

West Main Master Plan for downtown Pensacola unveiled

Urban planning expert Jeff Speck and Marina Khoury, a partner at the urban planning firm DPZ, give a presentation Tuesday on the West Main Master Plan at the Studer Community Institute.   (Photo: Jim Little)

Urban planning expert Jeff Speck and Marina Khoury, a partner at the urban planning firm DPZ, give a presentation Tuesday on the West Main Master Plan at the Studer Community Institute. (Photo: Jim Little)

Over the past 15 years, several plans have been drawn up for the Community Maritime Park, but Studer Properties is hoping the West Main Master Plan is the one that can become a reality over the next 15 years.

Urban planning expert Jeff Speck, along with Marina Khoury, a partner at the urban planning firm DPZ, held their "midway" presentation Tuesday evening at the Studer Community Institute building to unveil concepts their team is working on to develop the West Main Master Plan.

Studer Properties hired the urban planners after it signed an 18-month lease option with the city of Pensacola to come up with a master plan for the seven undeveloped properties at Community Maritime Park and the former Emerald Coast Utilities Authority downtown sewage treatment facility that is owned by Pensacola businessman Quint Studer.

Pensacola residents give input on proposed downtown changes

PENSACOLA, Fla. (WKRG) -- More than 100 residents in Pensacola saw plans for major downtown improvements and gave their feedback at a meeting Tuesday night. 

The majority of the proposed development would happen at Community Maritime Park near the Blue Wahoos Stadium and across from it on Main Street. Developers say they need more retail on the west side of downtown and to make it all more walkable. 

"It's going to be a walk to remember when you come to Pensacola in a few years when we've got all this set in the ground," Rand Hicks said. 

Jeff Speck Takes On Current I-45 Expansion Plan, Inspires More Action

Developer offers a vision to get Kenmore Square moving

Developer offers a vision to get Kenmore Square moving

Kenmore Square may never be the same.

A developer is proposing to build a major hotel and plaza in the heart of the square that would dramatically change the way vehicles, pedestrians, and bicycles move through the congested intersection.

Robert Korff, who owns the Citizens Bank building at the junction of Commonwealth Avenue and Beacon Street, unveiled the bold plan Tuesday night at a community meeting.

Drawings show a flatiron-shaped tower — designed by prominent Chicago architecture firm Studio Gang — soaring nearly 300 feet above the square, with a spacious plaza at its base that replaces what is now largely asphalt. Most significantly, Korff wants to cut a new street behind the hotel that would connect Commonwealth Avenue and Beacon Street and allow much of the traffic that now passes through the five-way intersection to be diverted around it.